Penn State Media Sales / Sociology

Sociology DVDs Offered by Penn State Media Sales

Leisurama

The vacation culture of the late 1950's and early 1960's has become a uniques slice of Cold War period Americana. World War II vetrans now had families.The United State and the Soviet Union became gripped in a technological and social race. This battle affected the soul of every citizen, and even shaped housing in America. The Leisurama Story is one of ambition, creative marketing and a desire to leave behind the daily grind and escape to a fun playful utopia. It is a story about a post-war nation searching for peace and diversion on the home front. It is a story about the clash of ideologies and about suntans, fishing and barbecues. Leisurama Vacation, 1950 1960

The Kayapo: Out of the Forest - Disappearing World

The destruction of Brazil's Amazonian rain forest now threatens the existence of its native peoples. The Kayapo Indians have gained international recognition for their bold political resistance and for the reassertion of their traditional cultural identity. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Terry Turner. Blue Ribbon winner, American Film Festival. Sequel to The Kayapo (51222). English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

The Trobriand Islanders of Papua New Guinea - Disappearing World

Examines the society that inhabits the Trobriand Islands off the eastern tip of Papua New Guinea, showing the complex balance of male authority and female wealth as well as the magic and sorcery that pervades everyday life. Examines two events in particular: distribution of a woman's estate after her death and the celebration following a yam harvest. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Annette B. Weiner. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

Mbira dza Vadzimu: Urban and Rural Ceremonies with Hakurotwi Mudhe

One of a series of films examining in detail the use of the traditional African mbira in the cultural life of the Mashona people of Rhodesia. Focuses on Hakurotwi Mudhe, singer and leader of a professional group of mbira players. An intense and religious man, he is shown in the various kinds of performances -- at an informal urban Friday night bira or nhandaro, at a sacrifice, and at a funeral -- that have made him one of the best known Shona musicians of the area. Produced by ethnomusicologists Gei Zantzinger and Andrew Tracey.

Masai Manhood - Disappearing World

Masai warriors of East Africa live on the fringes of society. They are not permitted to marry and are excluded from tribal decision making. This program focuses on the lives of these young men until the time of the eunoto, a dramatic four-day ceremony that marks their transition from warrior to elder. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Melissa Llewelyn-Davies. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

Kypseli: Women and Men Apart -- A Divided Reality

Documents the peasant society of Kypseli, a small, isolated Greek village on the island of Thera in the Cyclades. Looks at how the people divide time, space, material possessions, and activities according to an underlying pattern based on separation of the sexes, and shows how this division in turn determines the village social structure. Kypseli: Women and Men Apart -- A Divided Reality directed by Richard Cowan and Paul Aratow. Adviser: Susannah Hoffman. Anthropology

Masai Women - Disappearing World

The Masai are animal herders in the East African Rift Valley. This program looks at the women of the tribe -- from childhood through marriage to old age -- and their role in a completely male-dominated society. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Melissa Llewelyn-Davies. Blue Ribbon winner, American Film Festival. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Magical Death

Focuses on the role of an older Yanomamo Indian, Dedeheiwa, who is a prominent political leader and renowned shaman from a village in the Orinoco River area of southern Venezuela and northern Brazil. Documents the activities that take place in a two-day period during which Dedeheiwa organizes many of the co-villagers in a joint magical attack on the souls of children in a distant village. Shows use of hallucinogenic snuff by shamans. Suited for courses relating religious activities to political and social organization. (Ref: Chagnon, N.A., Studying the Yanomamo, NY: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1974.) Also see The Feast (31606) and Yanomamo: A Multi-Disciplinary Study (50259). From the Yanomamo series. Napoleon Chagnon. Blue Ribbon winner, American Film Festival.

Mbira: The Technique of the Mbira dza Vadzimu

One of a series of films examining in detail the use of the traditional African mbira in the cultural life of the Mashona people of Rhodesia. Introduces the musical technique and sound of the mbira dza vadzimu, played by Ephrat Mujuru, a leading mbiraplayer. Using animation and freeze-frame techniques, the film includes a demonstration of some of the rhythmic and harmonic elements of the music, of the use of improvisation, of different styles of playing a song, and of the combination of two mbiras in a duet. Produced by ethnomusicologists Gei Zantzinger and Andrew Tracey.ZX

The Kayapo - Disappearing World

Documents how dramatically life changed for the Kayapo after 1982, when thousands of outsiders invaded the tribe's Amazonian rain forest following the discovery of gold on their land. The fiercely independent Kayapo were forced to become "businesspeople" or see their traditional way of life destroyed. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Terry Turner. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

Mbira dza Vadzimu: Dambatsoko -- An Old Cult Center with Muchatera and Ephrat Mujuru

One of a series of films examining in detail the use of the traditional African mbira in the cultural life of the Mashona people of Rhodesia. Focuses on Muchatera Mujuru, the leader of one of the few remaining traditional cult centers in Shona country. It shows him as a spiritual man, yet concerned with his waning authority in a changing Rhodesia. Various aspects of the life of his adherents at Dambatsoko are seen, including daily economic activities and ceremonies in the big banya ritual house, at the mutoro hut, at the rushanga shrine, and at a sacrifice. Produced by ethnomusicologists Gei Zantzinger and Andrew Tracey.

Mbira: Matepe dza Mhondoro -- A Healing Party/

One of a series of films examining in detail the use of the traditional African mbira in the cultural life of the Mashona people of Rhodesia. Presents a vignette of the music and activities at a healing party held in northeast Rhodesia at the home of a sick woman. A trio of matepe dza mhondoro mbiras is played, under the leadership of Saini Murira, together with rattles, drums, singers, and dancing by two mediums, who interrupt the music to attend to the patient. Produced by ethnomusicologists Gei Zantzinger and Andrew Tracey.

Afghan Exodus - Disappearing World

When Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan, approximately one million Afghans, including Kirghiz, Hazara, and Pathans, fled over the borders into neighboring countries. But the Pathans were eager to take back their homeland, even if it meant confronting Soviet jet fighters and tanks. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologists: Akbar Ahmed and Remy Dor. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

The Meo - Disappearing World

Before the Vietnam War, the Meo of Indochina grew maize and opium, and lived in villages with their extended families. When the war shattered their peaceful existence, most males fourteen years of age and over joined the fighting while tens of thousands of other Meo fled to refugee camps. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Jacques Lemoine. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

The Whale Hunters of Lamalera - Disappearing World

The Lamaholot, who inhabit an Indonesian island, hunt sperm whale with forged iron harpoons ten hours a day, six days a week, eight months a year. But their way of life is jeopardized by the scarcity of their prey, and they are leaving their island village of Lamalera to seek more profitable work elsewhere. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Robert Barnes. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

The Mende - Disappearing World

This village portrait of some 260 Mende people who live in the forest of Sierra Leone shows successful citizens and unlucky ones, clowns and gossips, happy households and divided ones. The Mende recognize the constant presence of a supernatural world that affects farming, fishing, and all other aspects of their daily routine. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Mariane Ferme. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

The Mende - Disappearing World

This village portrait of some 260 Mende people who live in the forest of Sierra Leone shows successful citizens and unlucky ones, clowns and gossips, happy households and divided ones. The Mende recognize the constant presence of a supernatural world that affects farming, fishing, and all other aspects of their daily routine. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Mariane Ferme. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

Dances of Southern Africa

Presents the recreational dances performed by men from many tribes who took work contracts at South African mines. Dances are performed at the mines and in the Tribal Trust Lands. Compares the typical southern African emphasis on stomping movements with the more individual step-dances of the northern Mashona tribes. Working with ethnochoreologist Nadia Chilkovsky, the filmmakers have kept the dance sequences intact and close-ups are avoided so that the dances can be analyzed by choreologists. Adviser: Andrew Tracey. Directed and produced by Gei Zantzinger.

Mbira: Njari -- Karanga Songs in Christian Ceremonies with Simon Mashoko

One of a series of films examining in detail the use of the traditional African mbira in the cultural life of the Mashona people of Rhodesia. Focuses on Magwenyambira Simon Mashoko, a rural Catholic catechist and njari mbira player famous in Shona country. In addition to the traditional spirit repertoire, he has adapted the mbira successfully for use in the Catholic Church. He is seen moving and performing in both the traditional sphere, at a beer party and a dance party, and also at a catechism class and a Sunday church service held at his home. Produced by ethnomusicologists Gei Zantzinger and Andrew Tracey.

The Mursi: The Land Is Bad - Disappearing World

Because of a series of natural and manmade disasters, the Mursi of the Omo Valley in southwestern Ethiopia believe that the very land on which they live is turning against them. Despite this, the Mursi remain faithful to old ways and traditions, herding cattle and cultivating sorghum even as the Omo River's flood level continues to drop. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: David Turton. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

The Eagle's Children

Available in Spanish or English "La Danza de la Conquista del Gran Tenochtitlan", also known as "Los Concheros", "Danza Azteca", & "Danza Chichimeca", traces its origins to pre-Columbian Nahua ("Aztec") roots. Its adherents are organized into dance groups, each led by a "Capitan de Danza", who must obey one of the "Generales" who head distinct lineages and claim to pass traditional lore down from before the Spanish invasion of Mexico. The "Danzantes" must take part in a complex series of "obligaciones" throughout the year. At the great annual pilgrimage to the shrine of Chalma, thousands of "Danzantes" from Mexico and the US gather for four days of ritual and dance. Since the 1960's, Mexican dance teachers like Florencio Yescas and Andres Segura have brought the "Danza" to the US. The Eagle's Children follows Mexican-American "Danzantes" to Chalma, Central Texas, and San Diego, as they rediscover their indigenous heritage.

Inside Afghanistan

Shot in Kabul, Herat, Kandahar, Spinbuldak, and the Afghan countryside in 1987, this film is a look at the *other* side of the war in Afghanistan - the Communist government and its supporters. Inside Afghanistan opens with an examination of the war as seen by the Afghan army. After a ride with an armored column transporting supplies from the Soviet border. We have tea with an Afghan captain, his Russian wife, and their two sons, as he explains the bond he feels with the other Afghan officers who trained in the Soviet Union. An Afghan colonel explains how these Soviet-trained army officers led the "revolution" that brought the Communists to power. At a tank training ground, an officer extols the "revolution". The documentary then looks at the educated, urban modernizers and reformers who saw the "revolution" as a way to bring Afghanistan into the modern world, even if on the Soviet model: women teachers and medical students, doctors at a children's hospital, boys at a Soviet orphanage, government officials, party members, and a rare interview with then- President Najibullah himself. The second half of the film moves to the countryside, where we visit several groups of villagers who had left the Mujahedin and were fighting on the government side under the same khans (clan landlords) who earlier had led them in their fight against the government. In a peaceful village square, a group of villagers discuss their needs, unaware of the camera, while in another village a government propaganda team entertains and passes out gifts. Under attack by Mujahedin at a remote outpost, we go to the nearby artillery base, which responds with a devastating barrage of rockets and howitzers. In the Kandahar prison, we meet two Taliban POWs, who in spite of torture tell us courageously that they still believe they were right to fight. Finally, at a meal in his home, the governor of Kandahar province breaks down in tears as he tells us of the deaths of his sons in this long and bloody war. Inside Afghanistan underscores the chasm between the urbanized, Westernizing supporters of the Communist government and the traditional Muslim world of the villages, still based on clan and feudal ties. Without preaching, the film breaks the stereotypes of Communist "puppets" and heroic "Freedom Fighters" to give the viewer a new understanding of the tragic and complex struggle for change in Afghanistan - a struggle that is far from over.

Loss in a New Light

L24612VH, 1989 . This video features four people who discuss how they faced and coped with a significant loss in adulthood, including losing custody of a child, losing health in mid-life, becoming a quadriplegic as a young man, and losses associated with moving to a retirement home.

An Adolescent Group: Social Springboard for Personal Growth

Records progress among emotionally disturbed teenagers who meet daily as a cabin group at Camp Wediko, and documents procedures and techniques for the purpose of training and research. Print material included. From the Wediko series. Dr. Edward A.Mason.

Chenchus Children of the Forest

The Chenchus are a Telugu speaking food-gathering tribe living in the Nallamalai forests of Andhra Pradesh in India spread over the districts of Mahaboobnagar, Kurnool, Prakasam and Guntur. They are a conservative tribal group and have not made many changes in their lifestyle or tried to adapt to modernity. They live in the enclosed space and geography, leading a life of an unbroken continuity. Centuries of life in the forest have deprived the Chenchus of an ability to adapt easily to modern life. Though some of their children are sent to government schools, there are very few instances of educated Chenchus finding their way into mainstream modern society. This film shows the Chenchus struggling to adapt to new patterns of life as the forest resources dwindle with time.

Against the Odds

A report on young black men fighting to survive and succeed on America's meanest inner-city streets, where they battle almost overwhelming odds: high rates of murder and drug abuse, a much greater likelihood of ending up in prison than in college, rampant unemployment and bleak job prospects, and poor health. Makes the point, however, that many are beating those odds. Produced by CBS for "48 Hours."

Bride Service

One of Dedeheiwa's sons returns to the Yanomamo village with meat and fruits. Dedeheiwa, a headman in this southern Venezuela community, conspicuously shouts across the village for the boy's father-in-law to come and claim the food. The man sends his youngest wife, a girl ten years old, to fetch the items. From the Yanomamo series. Napoleon Chagnon.

Cops on Trial

Poses the questions: When are the police "just doing their job"? And when are they overdoing it? In the aftermath of the Rodney King beating, this program examines how the nation's police departments are drawing the fine line between justifiable force and brute force. Looks at cases of suspected brutality in three cities and at a training program for rookie cops in Sacramento. Produced by CBS for "48 Hours."

Dance and Human History

An introduction to Alan Lomax' research on choreometrics, a cross-cultural method of studying the relationship of dance style to social structure. Demonstrates how dance can be measured using the human geometry of movement, the classification of movement according to one-, two-, or three- dimensionality, and the use of the torso as a single or multiunit.

The Edward R. Murrow Collection: Harvest of Shame

Classic 1960 documentary expose, narrated by Murrow, of the degradation and exploitation of millions of migrant farm workers in the United States. More recent evaluations of the situation can be found in The Migrants: 1980 (50565) and New Harvest, Old Shame (61735). Produced by David Lowe for the CBS Reports series. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

A Father Washes His Children

Dedeheiwa, a shaman and headman in his Yanomamo village of southern Venezeuela, takes nine of his young children to the river and washes them carefully and patiently. From the Yanomamo series. Timothy Asch and Napoleon Chagnon.

Fire on the Rim: 1 -- Fire into Gold

This four-part series explores the ways Pacific Rim cultures cope with the seismic and volcanic episodes that frequent their world, noting that the "ring of fire" that stretches more than 30,000 miles around the rim of the Pacific Ocean is the site of the most destructive earthquakes and volcanoes in recorded history. The first program examines the natural riches that continue to attract people to these perilous regions. Narrated by Bill Kurtis and produced by a global consortium of broadcasting organizations.

Fire on the Rim: 2 -- Stories from the Earth

All around the "ring of fire," cultures old and new have incorporated tales of geological disasters into myths and legends as a means of coping with the impact of these events. This program delves into the fascinating ways in which people have responded to the unpredictable workings of the Earth.

Fire on the Rim: 3 -- The Prediction Problem

Explains that societies for centuries have sought continually to improve the means of predicting earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and that although modern technology enables scientists to make intelligent guesses about these events, forecasting remains an imperfect art.

Fire on the Rim: 4 -- Preparing for Disaster

States that damage resulting from seismic activity can be minimized by careful planning and technological innovations. This program looks at the many methods people have devised through the ages in their attempts to survive the upheavals that plague the lands around the "ring of fire."

Jaguar and the Revenge of the Twins as Told by Daramasiwa

A Yanomamo Indian of southern Venezuela tells the myth about the twin ancestors, Omawa and Yoasiwa, and how they outsmarted and killed Jaguar, an animal both feared and respected by the Yanomamo, yet in this myth made to appear both foolish and clumsy. The myth serves as a justification of the Yanomamo practice of vengeance. From the Yanomamo series. Napoleon Chagnon. English subtitles.

Legacy: 1 -- Iraq: The Cradle of Civilization

This six-part series reveals the character and accomplishments of the world's first urban civilizations by conducting a modern-day exploration of ancient societies whose influence continues to shape the world. The first program reviews humankind's first cities, built 5,000 years ago along the Euphrates River in Mesopotamia (southern Iraq) where Western civilization, as it is known today, began. Host and writer: British historian Michael Wood. Produced by Peter Spry-Leverton. CLOSED CAPTIONED Aso included on disk is: Legacy: 2 -- India: The Empire of the Spirit

Legacy: 3 -- China: The Mandate of Heaven

Presents the synthesis of East and West, illustrating how ancient China, through its many innovations such as iron-casting, gunpowder, and printing, changed the Western world and influenced modern civilization without threatening its own traditions: Confucianism, reverence for ancestors, and harmony. CLOSED CAPTIONED Also included on disk is: Legacy: 4 -- Egypt: The Habit of Civilization

Legacy: 4 -- Egypt: The Habit of Civilization

Views Pharaonic Egypt as the most enduring of the ancient civilizations, one that created the institutions upon which other nations are still built -- bureaucratic government, organized religion, and international trade -- and shows how ancient traditions come together in today's Middle Eastern Moslem culture. CLOSED CAPTIONED Also included on disk: Legacy: 3 -- China: The Mandate of Heaven A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Legacy: 5 -- Central America: The Burden of Time

Shows how the early Aztec, Mayan, and Incan peoples developed sophisticated Central American civilizations independently of the Mediterranean empires, but with striking similarities: organized government and religion (and the massive buildings to house them), international trade, scientific systems, and written languages. CLOSED CAPTIONED Also included on Disk: Legacy: 6 -- Europe: The Barbarian West

Legacy: 6 -- Europe: The Barbarian West

Traces the origins of Western culture through Greece and Rome and shows how it developed, through its own genius and by borrowing from the legacies of the five oldest civilizations, into the first organized world culture rich with ideals of freedom, individualism, and democracy, which often led paradoxically to subjugation and exploitation of "inferior" cultures. CLOSED CAPTIONED Also included on Disk: Legacy: 5 -- Central America: The Burden of Time

Mini-Dragons: Taiwan

Begins with the first democratic election in Taiwan's history, an event with resounding effects on the whole society. Amidst deep idealistic conflicts, Taiwan continues to enjoy phenomenal economic success and is predicted to be the most successful of the "mini-dragons" in the coming century. CLOSED CAPTIONED A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Mini-Dragons: Hong Kong

This four-part series explores the personal stories of men and women within four Pacific Rim nations, piecing together a larger portrait of the region as a whole. The first program examines Hong Kong through the eyes of its citizens, who offer a clear picture of what makes the country a dynamic economic power while displaying a common anxiety about an uncertain future. CLOSED CAPTIONED A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Mini-Dragons: South Korea

Captures the profound challenges faced by South Korea's people as they grapple with a relatively new form of government as well as the impending transition to a new technology-based economy. Reflects the turmoil of explosive growth, change, and disparity between rich and poor. CLOSED CAPTIONED

Mini-Dragons 2: Thailand

Points out that while the newly created Thai middle class shops at massive luxury malls, the rural poor labor under difficult conditions. Income distribution, infrastructure problems, and the destruction of the natural environment pose major problems for the fragile government. CLOSED CAPTIONED A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Mini-Dragons 2: Malaysia

Explores some of the human stories in Malaysia's economic development, such as the manager of a rubber plantation who is losing his work force to jobs in the city and a woman who runs a counseling center for rural women who work in high-tech factories and are undergoing a kind of culture shock. CLOSED CAPTIONED A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Mini-Dragons 2: Indonesia

This three-part series profiles three Pacific Rim nations that are relatively new players in the global economic arena, exploring such common issues as the impact of old ethnic rivalries, roles of women, foreign investment, and the balance between protecting natural environments and keeping exports high. The first program shows how Indonesia's rapid technological growth has created a disparity in wealth distribution that threatens to trigger ethnic conflict. CLOSED CAPTIONED

Prisoner or Patient?

Investigates how the British criminal justice and psychiatric systems deal with the mentally ill offender, suggesting that the systems have not yet determined whether these offenders should be handled as prisoners or patients. Produced by the BBC for the Horizon series.

Stuck on Welfare

Visits Middle America to profile an unmarried mother and her five children living on welfare, a man who once was on welfare and now works more than 100 hours a week to stay off it, and a welfare worker who juggles the problems of his 293-family caseload. Examines an experimental Wisconsin program that sponsors people for job training -- but it's not quite what it seems. Produced by CBS for "48 Hours."

Three Styles of Marital Conflict

Presents re-enacted case studies based on clinical experience and research on common types of dysfunctional marital conflict: hidden agendas behind behavior, the role of the passive partner in a marriage, and the overadequate/underadequate couple.

To Care: America's Voluntary Spirit

Discusses the phenomenon of donating and volunteering in American life. Uses as a premise the concept that contributors and volunteers in the private sector are citizens who care about causes and people, contributing billions of dollars and countless hours of labor without seeking recognition for their money and effort. Designed to encourage support of private sector activities. Produced by Francis Thompson, Inc., for the Independent Sector.

Stoney Knows How

Stoney Knows How is a visit with a master of the Oldest Art In The World - Tattooing. Disabled by arthritis since the age of four, confined to a wheelchair, his growth stunted, Stoney St. Clair joined the circus at 15 as a sword-swallower A year later, he took up tattooing, and traveled with circuses and carnivals for 50 years. As we watch him at work, we see the determination which led Stoney to use his crippled hands in an art where mistakes are permanent, and we realize Stoney has overcome his handicap to heal himself and others with the magic of symbols. The film ends with a visit by New Age tattoo master Don Ed Hardy to Stoney, who gives him a souvenir tattoo.

Carrousel Menagerie

Carrousel Menagerie explores the superb carousels of yesteryear and the people who preserve their heritage today. At the Herschel Carousel Museum, we see the mechanics of a classic Herschel carousel in action as it starts up for the day. In her home, a carousel enthusiast shows off her collection of carousel animals, teapots, and music boxes. Back at the Museum, modern carvers create wooden animals to the famous Herschel patterns, and new punched paper rolls are printed for turn-of-the-century carousel player organs like that at the Dentzel Menagerie Carousel in Rochester, NY. As you ride along on this beautifully restored carousel, you will share the infectious delight of its young riders, and relive your own first ride on a wooden steed! Everyone loves a carousel, and this film shows you why! Produced & Directed by Greg Thall

The Tree of Knowledge

Set in Huehuetla, Puebla, a Totonac Indian community in East Central Mexico, The Tree of Knowledge contrasts two systems of education. The public school system uses patriotic symbols to "integrate" Indian pupils into the national culture while teaching them to reject their own identity. In contrast, the Danza de los Huehues urges young Totonacs to learn from the mestizos ("whites"), yet warns them not to abandon their own culture.  But there is also a deeper, older level to the ritual: it is not the mestizos, but the living spirits of trees, who are the real spirits of the Danza, and who teach the Totonacs how to live in harmony with nature. That is where the Dance began...   But there is also a deeper, older level to the ritual: it is not the mestizos, but the living spirits of trees, who are the real spirits of the Danza, and who teach the Totonacs how to live in harmony with nature. That is where the Dance began...   Set in Huehuetla, Puebla, a Totonac Indian community in East Central Mexico, The Tree of Knowledge contrasts two systems of education. The public school system uses patriotic symbols to "integrate" Indian pupils into the national culture while teaching them to reject their own identity. In contrast, the Danza de los Huehues urges young Totonacs to learn from the mestizos ("whites"), yet warns them not to abandon their own culture.  "Throughout the film we see the divided nature of the town: a close-up of a caged dove - the Indian locked into a Spanish world. The remarks of the school principal (of course a mestizo): 'Our main interest is that the children learn Spanish . . . If we speak to a sixth grade pupil in Totonac, he is insulted. He says, 'I speak Spanish now. Why do you talk to me in Totonac?'' . . . Lane's approach is indirect and symbolic; he avoids interpretive narration in favor of allowing visual and spoken symbolism to carry the message . . . Lane has made a useful contribution both to peasant studies and to the methodology of ethnographic film as well." Dr. Michael Logan The American Anthropologist, 1984

Democracia Indigena

Available in Spanish or English Democracia Indigena examines the rights revolution of Indian Mexico through the municipal elections in Huehuetla, Puebla - the same Totonac Indian community featured in "The Tree of Life" and "The Tree of Knowledge". In 1989, the Huehuetla Totonacs formed the Organizacion Independiente Totonaca (OIT), and joined in an electoral alliance with the Partido de la Revolucion Democratica to sweep the municipal elections. During the following nine years, the OIT and PRD carried out a non-violent revolution. The visible signs of this Totonac renaissance are the health posts, schools, drinking water, and electricity available to everyone for the first time. But the real change is in the new self-confidence and pride of the Totonacs themselves. Democracia Indigena follows Cruz Garcia, an "expatriate" Totonac, as he examines the changes in his homeland. Opening with the PRD electoral campaign, Cruz meets with the Totonac mayor and council, , visits rural projects, talks with his Totonac family and neighbors, as well as the parish priest and the mestizo mayoral candidate of the opposition PRI. With Cruz, we watch the voting, the vote counting, and the stunning 3 am victory celebration. The film concludes with an examination of the strengths and weaknesses of this powerful example of democracy in action.

African-American Inventors

Ossie Davis narrates a tribute to minority inventors who pursued their dreams from inception to reality, as they contributed to the fields of science, technology, and medicine. ©1986

African-American Leaders of the 20th Century

The 20th Century was a time of great and sweeping changes all over the world. American society underwent a metamorphosis of unprecedented proportions. Learn about the African-American leaders who emerged during this era of transition to play important roles and to make a difference not only for members of their own race, but for all of the citizens of the United States. ©2002

Yaaba Soore: Path of the Ancestors

Both Yaaba Soore: Path of the Ancestors and Dance of the Spirits explain the meaning of African masks. During a 17 - year period Christopher Roy traveled through Burkina Faso, West Africa, observing funerals, initiations, market day dances, and village purification ceremonies. He learned the vital importance of these masked performances in the daily life of African peoples. Only after years of study was Roy able to gain permission to film the actual ceremonies of the masks for the first time and fully explain the meaning of these art objects. From this rare footage Roy created two unique programs for the world. Yaaba Soore: Path of the Ancestors, ideal for instruction of junior and senior high students, provides interpretations of the mask performances that make the objects we see displayed in American museums more meaningful. The emphasis is on the performance and the successful impersonation of the character of the spirit represented by the mask.

Dance of the Spirits

Dance of the Spirits is ideal for in-depth study of African masks. It provides detailed analysis of the unique music, dance steps, costumes and audience interaction contributing to the effective impersonation of each of the characters the masks represent. By presenting them in their respective context, Christopher Roy's footage continues to capture the viewer's interest.

Understanding Terrorism Series Afghanistan: The Lost Generation

An Ancient Culture drowns in a Sea of Brutality. After enduring twenty-five years of civil strife, a botched occupation attempt and countless calamities, Afghanistan has finally returned to a state of relative-though fragile-calm. Controlled by a violent autocratic regime intent on eradicting personal liberties and forcing society back into the Dark Ages, Afghanistan faces a new set of challenges. Afghanistan: The Lost Generation is not about politics or religion. It is an unflinching look at the atrocities of war, and a personal visit to a nation and a people struggling to survive in the total desperation caused by an almost perpetual state of conflict. In a nation of countless victims, thousands of emotionally and physically crippled survivors-maimed children, widows and silent scholars-struggle to rebuild their lives. Ustad Kamal, a dean of traditional music and a virtuoso of the two-stringed dotar, uses his music to alleviate his pain and fight the cultural genocide destroying his country. Twelve-year-old Bashir lost both his feet in a rocket blast that struck his home and killed his parents, yet he works to provide food for his six surviving brothers and sisters. Nasrullah, a soldier crippled by war, clings to memories of his lost childhood amid the brutal reality of death and destruction. This is the struggle to rebuild a new Afghanistan as seen through the eyes of the lost generation.

The Tuareg - Disappearing World

Life has changed drastically for the Tuareg of the Algerian desert since slavery, the economic basis of their society, was abolished in 1962. The Tuareg carry on their traditions and customs to maintain prestige, but the schools are teaching their children about the world outside the desert. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Jeremy Keenan. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Carnaval Bahia - Disappearing World

Presents the music and dance in northern Brazil's Bahia during Carnaval, a five-day pre-Lenten celebration that precedes Shrove Tuesday. Festival participants divide into groups, each trying to outdo the other in producing spectacular floats, dazzling costumes, and exuberant displays. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Peter Fry. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

Jeannie Magill-Milking the Rhino Explore new strategies for conservation.

HOME USE RIGHTS How can conservation benefit both wildlife and humans? Jeannie Magill, originator and co-producer of the documentary Milking the Rhino, discusses how community-based conservation is working for two tribes in Africa. Jeannie Magill owned and operated Westwind Safaris and Tours, a company specializing in educational safaris to Kenya. She was a visiting scholar with the African Studies programs at Northwestern University, and she served as a consultant to the renovation of the African wing of Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History. Magill has chaired panel discussions for the African Trade Association Congress, presented numerous educational talks, and published many articles for travel trade newspapers and magazines. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

Allen Sack Counterfeit Amateurs

CLASSROOM USE In the world of collegiate athletics, students are increasingly treated as commodities rather than pupils. Allen Sack discusses drawbacks of this shift in values as well as what the future of college sports might look like. Allen Sack was a highly recruited high school athlete: a star quarterback and basketball player from a small town near Philadelphia. He went on to become a member of Notre Dame's 1966 national championship football team. While drafted for the pros, Sack chose instead to go to graduate school. He studied sociology at Penn State, where he became interested in the sociology of sports. He taught in the department of sociology at the University of New Haven for many years and became professor of management in 1991. He has been director of the sports management program there since 2001. Sack is co-author of College Athletes for Hire: The Evolution and Legacy of the NCAA's Amateur Myth (1998). From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

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